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Thermonuclear supernovae explain iron-rich metal-poor stars

Paper Authors:

Zachary Reeves,

Kevin C. Schlaufman,

Henrique Reggiani

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Key Details

Iron-rich metal-poor stars have low alpha/iron ratios explained by thermonuclear supernovae

These stars should be more common where thermonuclear supernovae were important

Occurrences support the theory: more common in dwarf galaxies and Magellanic Clouds

Similar occurrences in Milky Way field and globular clusters imply time lag between generations

AI generated summary

Thermonuclear supernovae explain iron-rich metal-poor stars

This paper finds iron-rich metal-poor stars are more common in dwarf galaxies and the Magellanic Clouds than the Milky Way field or globular clusters. This occurrence pattern supports the idea these stars formed from gas enriched by thermonuclear supernovae, which played a bigger role in dwarf galaxy chemical evolution.

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